Lab Members

  • Maria Karayiorgou

    Professor/Head of Lab
    (212) 568-4189

     

    I developed a strong intellectual interest in Psychiatry during my teen years. The pursuit of this interest translated into medical studies, clinical training in Psychiatry and academic research in Psychiatric Genetics. Indeed, I was one of the first psychiatrists to train in molecular genetics. The major contribution of my research has been the discovery of the importance of rare genetic variants in schizophrenia etiology, starting with an early publication that established the significance of chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletions in schizophrenia (Karayiorgou et al. PNAS 1995, 92(17):7612-6) and culminating with four recent publications that characterized the genome-wide landscape of rare genetic mutations (both point mutations and copy number mutations) in schizophrenia (Xu et al. Nature Genetics 2008, 40(7):880-5; Xu et al. PNAS 2009, 106(39):16746-51; Xu et al. Nature Genetics 2011, 43(9):864-8; Xu et al. Nature Genetics 2012, 44(12):1365-9). I have also keenly pursued translational studies in close collaboration with Joseph Gogos, and offered significant insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia through our animal model studies. I love opera, gourmet food and traveling. I also enjoy spending time with my amazing daughter Leonora.

     

     

  • Joseph A. Gogos

    Professor/Head of Lab
    (212) 305-2020

    Joseph Gogos received a M.D. from the National University of Greece (Athens) and a Ph. D. from Harvard University (Cambridge) where he worked on understanding the specificity of transcriptional control. Following a brief postdoc with the late Hal Weintraub in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (Seattle), Joseph spent five years in the laboratory of Richard Axel at Columbia University (New York) working on how sensory maps are formed in the mammalian brain. During this period Joseph also collaborated with Maria Karayiorgou to generate and analyze  the first genetic mouse models of schizophrenia. Joseph's lab explores schizophrenia’s complex but fascinating genetic and neural landscape and has contributed a series of important new insights, including the first demonstration of rare (inherited and de novo) mutations in schizophrenia, its implications for the genetic architecture of the disease and the first in depth insights on how schizophrenia mutations affect the structure and function of brains of animal models. Joseph enjoys art, opera, French new wave cinema and reading on history and philosophy of science. In the midst of his hectic schedule, he seeks out and savors life's simple pleasures such as the bright blue and white summer days in the Aegean sea.

  • Bin Xu

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurobiology (Psychiatry)
    (212) 305-2020

    Bin Xu received his undergraduate degree in Genetics from Wuha University in China, a M.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Beijing Medical University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Genetics from Rutgers in New Jersey. His current studies include identification of de novo and rare inherited copy number mutations in human schizophrenia patients and exploring the relationship between abnormal microRNA gene expression and schizophrenia pathophysiology using animal models. In his free time he enjoys reading and watching Sci-Fi, taking long walks with his wife, and, when he gets the chance, playing volleyball and badminton.

  • Jun Mukai

    Associate Research Scientist
    (212) 305-2020

    Dr. Jun Mukai received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Mie University in Japan where he also trained as a psychiatrist. He has extensive clinical experience diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia as well as basic science research into the molecular alterations that predispose to this disorder. He hopes his research will identify new molecular targets for rationally designed, novel therapeutic approaches and that it will rewrite psychiatric textbooks. This will ultimately help galvanize a 21st century revolution towards the molecular understanding of the human mind that surpasses 20th century psychodynamic phenomenology. When not at the clinic or the lab, Dr. Mukai enjoys restoring classic American Spirit Harley Davidson motorcycles.

     

  • Ziyi Sun

    Postdoctoral Research Scientist
    (212) 305-2020

    Ziyi Sun received her bachelor's degree in Pharmacology from Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the master's degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Nanjing University, China. In 2009, she graduated from Vanderbilt University with her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, where she received extensive training in electrophysiology in Dr. McMahon's lab. In her Ph.D. work, she studied mechanisms of the retinal neural network and focused her work on the hemi-gap-junction channel in horizontal cells. Her work focuses in utilizing electrophysiological techniques to study synaptic transmission between neurons generated by reprogramming cells from either mouse models or patients with schizophrenia. In her spare time, she likes baking, traveling, shopping and enjoying every happy moment with her family and friends.

     

  • Anastasia Diamantopoulou

    Postdoctoral Research Scientist
    212 543-1254

     

    Anastasia Diamantopoulou completed her PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Athens (Greece). Using a novel early life stress model in rodents, she studied the effects of challenging mother-pup interactions on brain development and psychopathology-related behavior in adulthood, as well as, on relevant neurotransmitter brain systems. Her current work as a Post-Doctoral Research Scientist and her research interests focus on the genetic, rather than the environmental, contribution to psychopathology, most specifically schizophrenia. Using mouse models of schizophrenia risk mutations and sophisticated in vivo imaging and behavioral assays (with special emphasis on cognitive paradigms) she attempts to add to the understanding of alterations in local network function in these models. Apart from being fascinated by science, she also enjoys literature and European cinema, while relaxing by knitting or biking.

     


     

     

  • Gregg Crabtree

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    (212) 305-2020

     

    Gregg completed his doctoral work in the Neurobiology and Behavior Program at Columbia University where by a combined approach of electrophysiology and calcium imaging studies he explored the role of the TRPV1 and other ion channels in modulating neuronal function and synaptic transmission within the mammalian central nervous system at physiological temperatures. Having completed his undergraduate degree in chemistry, Gregg’s main interests center around understanding the pharmacology of neurotransmitter pathways in health and disease. His current work combines both biochemical and electrophysiology studies to explore the possible causal roles of the elevated CNS proline levels in the presumptive synaptic dysfunction underlying the 22q11 deletion-associated psychiatric symptoms. In his spare time Gregg enjoys reading about art history and visiting the various art museums in NYC. His favorite bed-time reading includes readings from the four tomes of The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease.

     

  • Andrew Rosen

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    (212) 543-5722

    Andrew is a postdoctoral scientist in the laboratories of Joseph Gogos and Joshua Gordon. He received his Ph.D. from Binghamton University where he investigated the electrophysiological properties and circuitry underlying gustatory processing. Andrew is interested in systems neuroscience, particularly mechanisms of neural coding and the relationship between network connectivity and spiking dynamics. Currently, he is investigating the impact of schizophrenia-associated genetic mutations on cortico-hippocampal synchrony in a mouse model. Andrew enjoys skiing in the winter and swimming and biking in the summer.

     

  • Sander Markx

    Schizophrenia Research Fellow
    (212) 543-1254

    Sander Markx received his M.D. degree at the University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands). He completed his residency in psychiatry at the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University. He is currently interested in identifying copy number variations in specific patients’ populations who suffer from schizophrenia and generating animal models to study the pathogenesis of this debilitating disorder. Besides science, he enjoys art, literature, and music.

     

  • Talia Atkin

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    (212) 305-2020

    Talia received her undergraduate training from Oxford University in Physiological Sciences. She then went on to carry out her PhD in the lab of Dr Josef Kittler at University College London studying the role of DISC1 in intracellular transport mechanisms and protein aggregation. Talia is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow investigating the effect of copy number variance in schizophrenia on  neuronal development, structure and function. In her free time she enjoys exploring the food, the art and the culture New York has to offer.


     

  • Atsushi Takata

    Postdoctoral Research Scientist
    212 543 1254

    Atsushi Takata received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Kyushu University (Japan). He initially trained as a clinical psychiatrist, then learned basic neuroscience approaches using genetically engineered animals during his Ph.D. course in Kyushu University (supervised by Dr. Kawasaki) and RIKEN Brain Science Institute (Dr. Kato’s lab), and afterword worked on human genetics studies focusing on low-frequency and rare genetic variants (Dr. Kato’s lab and Dr. Yoshikawa’s lab in RIKEN). Currently he is pursuing additional risk variant(s) for schizophrenia with large effect size by utilizing next-generation sequencing technology. His ultimate aim is to go back the path he has followed so far, namely to identify robust genetic risks, then analyze how they contribute to the disease using basic neuroscience techniques, and finally translate basic science findings into the clinical setting. He is not only interested in human genetics, but also in horse genetics (pedigrees). He has a joint ownership of some race horses (but only having a 400th part) including several stakes winners such as Blumenblatt and Epiphaneia.

     

  • Tim Spellman

    Graduate Student
    (212) 305-2020

    Tim graduated from Dartmouth College as a Psychology major. Working as a research assistant and lab manager in Columbia's Brain Stimulation lab, he became increasingly interested in the physiological underpinnings of behavior and cognition -- specifically, the ways in which neural oscillatory events and states can predict, and potentially facilitate, the neural mechanisms that underly events such as seizures, states such as mood, and cognitive processes such as memory. He entered the Columbia doctoral program in Physiology and Cellular Biochemistry in 2008, and he is currently a member of the Gogos and Gordon labs, where he is studying the effects of schizophrenia associated genes on neural circuitry in the mouse model.Tim leads a parallel life as a musician, in the loosest sense of the word, and he can often be found behind drum sets in various backrooms, basements, and concert halls across Brooklyn.

  • Yan Sun

    Technician B
    (212) 543-1254

    Yan Sun received her B.A. from Union University in Beijing, China.  She is currently working as a Technician.  In her free time she enjoys swimming, hiking, yoga and reading.

     

  • Scarlet Woodrick

    Technician B
    (212) 543-1254

    Scarlet received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Oberlin College. She became interested in the neurobiology of psychiatric illness through her coursework and various research experiences in her undergraduate career, and hopes to eventually pursue an M.D./Ph.D. in the field.
    Outside of the lab she enjoys running, reading, and her work with children on the Autism Spectrum.

     

  • Adina Rusakov

    Technician B
    (212) 543-1254

    Adina graduated from Boston University with a major in Behavioral Biology. She became interested in neuroscience through her coursework, which led her to get involved in research. Before coming to Columbia, Adina studied the neurobiology of social behavior in ants and later investigated how neural activity in the entorhinal cortices contributes to learning and memory in rats. As a lab tech, Adina is excited to contribute to the understanding of the neural underpinnings of schizophrenia. In her spare time, Adina likes to visit art museums, attend ballets, and generally explore NY. She especially enjoys reading on the subway.

     

     

  • Caitlin Burgdorf

    Technician B
    (212) 305-2020

    Caitlin received her B.S. in neuroscience from Muhlenberg College. Throughout her undergraduate education, she was involved in several laboratories that explored the effects of stress on protein synthesis activity and cognitive flexibility. Caitlin is most interested in the neural mechanisms of psychiatric disorders and hopes to continue to investigate this in the future. In her free time, she enjoys exploring New York City, attending concerts, and biking along the Hudson River.

  • Naoko Haremaki

    Technician B
    212-305=2020
    Naoko received her B.A. on Pharmacology from Kitasato University in Tokyo, Japan.
    She is working as a technician.
    When she isn't working, she enjoys cooking, eating and taking walks in the city with her family.